Last edited by Vozragore
Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

7 edition of The French Paradox & Drinking for Health found in the catalog.

The French Paradox & Drinking for Health

by Gene Ford

  • 386 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Wine Appreciation Guild .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Dietetics & nutrition,
  • Wines,
  • Healthy Living,
  • Health & Fitness,
  • Cooking / Wine,
  • Health/Fitness,
  • General,
  • Beverages - Wine & Spirits,
  • Cooking

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages288
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8386670M
    ISBN 100932664814
    ISBN 109780932664815
    OCLC/WorldCa32070292

      The “French paradox,” and why researchers thought a bit of alcohol was good for you The story of light drinking as a healthy behavior started to . The recognition by scientists and the public of the potential health effects of moderate drinking increased approximately two decades ago from reports of the so-called `French Paradox': high levels of risk factors (such as a diet high in saturated fats, smoking cigarettes and little exercise) among the French but very low rates of coronary.

      Eddie Barclay knew what was up. credit In , in a 60 Minutes segment entitled “The French Paradox”, French researcher Serge Renaud, Ph.D. roiled the U.S. government by stating his research findings. Namely, by U.S. standards, the French do everything wrong in terms of health: they eat a high-fat diet, they don’t jog and they smoke, yet they have half the rate of heart disease ( vs.   The French Paradox Part 2 many children are drinking and eating a chemical cocktail. Organic pet food sales are growing at three times the rate of organic food for people. I'm half way.

    Debunking the French Paradox Red wine has been all the rage for a few years now, thanks to the observation known as the French Paradox. This term has been applied because supposedly the French have a lower obesity rate, lower percentage of coronary disease and longer life span despite their fat laden diet, alcohol consumption and smoking habits.   The “French Paradox” enigma appears to be solved. This widespread media coverage and launch of the “French Paradox” had a huge impact and since , Red wine consumption and sales increased by 39% in the USA, according to the Wine Spectator lifestyle magazine. The success is immediate! It’s such good news. A fatty diet + wine = good.


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The French Paradox & Drinking for Health by Gene Ford Download PDF EPUB FB2

The French Paradox refers to the notion that drinking wine may explain the relatively low rates of heart disease among the French, despite their fondness for cheese and other rich, fatty foods.

This theory helped spur the discovery of a host of beneficial plant compounds known as polyphenols. The French Paradox & Drinking for Health Paperback – October 1, by Gene Ford (Author) out of 5 stars 1 rating.

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other 1/5(1). The wine industry jumped on the “French paradox” story, promoting an epic marketing campaign which instilled in a lot of people the idea that drinking red wine is good for your heart.

It was so effective that I know people who didn’t drink alcohol at all, and started drinking a glass of red with their meals for fear that not doing so.

The book that has revolutionized America's thinking about drinking wine. This explains how drinking can be good for your health and how our government has suppressed this information. Includes scientific references on wine and health.

The French paradox is the observation of low coronary heart disease (CHD) death rates despite high intake of dietary cholesterol and saturated fat. 1, 2 The French paradox concept was formulated by French epidemiologists 3 in the s.

France is actually a country with low CHD incidence and mortality (table 1 1).The mean energy supplied by fat was 38% in Belfast and 36% in Toulouse in Cited by: Latest on French Paradox: Wine, Mediterranean Diet, and Your Health News for 05/15/ ; Wine, Mediterranean Diet, and Your Health News for 05/14/ ; Wine, Mediterranean Diet, and Your Health News for 05/13/ ; Wine, Mediterranean Diet, and Your Health News for 05/12/ The French Paradox and Beyond: Living Longer with Wine and the Mediterranean Lifestyle Renaissance Publishing, Backed by Dr.

Curtis Ellison, Chief, Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Boston University School of Medicine a supporter of the French Paradox, this book describes the benefits of the Mediterranean lifestyle. This book talks only a little in the beginning about the french paradox. 90% of the book is the author pushing people to drink alcohol.

There are a few recipes at the end of the book, to somehow make this seem legit. The author expounds on his political views about alcohol, and he then talks about cancer, menopause, heart disease (what does /5(3).

Wine, Mediterranean Diet, and Your Health News for 05/15/ - The French Paradox Please click on the links below to read the full articles. Wine Drinking red wine may ward off the winter sniffles Keep an eye on arsenic in wine Alcohol Industries Where Employees Drink The Most Central New York sees surge in binge drinking, especially among Followers: Latest on French Paradox: Wine, Mediterranean Diet, and Your Health News for 05/15/ Wine, Mediterranean Diet, and Your Health News for 05/14/ The so-called French Paradox is a term coined back in the s by three Frenchmen to explain a curious finding: If you chart death from heart attack versus the amount of saturated fat and cholesterol countries consume, there appears to be a straight line.

The more animal foods populations eat, the higher their death rates appear to be. Conversely, maybe if we got meat, egg, and dairy intake. Red wine is probably the most known French paradox contributor. Some scientists believe the French habit of moderate red wine drinking with a meal is the key to French paradox [].Resveratrol and other antioxidant flavonoids, natural chemical compounds found in red wine, may promote health benefits to the heart and blood vessels.

Thus, the real paradox is why the French paradox continues to exist as a concept, when it should be replaced by the less mystifying view, namely, “the more Mediterranean, the better”.

[1] —– This journal has a long article examining the French Paradox. There are strong regional variations in diet and disease patterns in France/5(37). Wine and Health: A Bio-Psycho-Social Perspective. There is both hope and hype in the notion that wine is good for your health. From the French Paradox to the Mediterranean Diet and the latest science of aging, let’s get to grips with the debate on wine and health.

The French Paradox. The term "French paradox" was coined by Serge Renaud, a scientist from Bordeaux University in France, and has been in use since the early s.

His paper was published in "Wine, alcohol, platelets, and the French paradox for coronary heart disease". And yet, despite the fact that Americans exercised more regularly than their French counterparts, how could the average Parisian be in better health than the average New Yorker.

The answer to this paradox: red wine. The segment boasted that by drinking at least one glass a day, the risk of heart attacks and blood clots would be greatly reduced. The segment popularized and legitimized the “French paradox”—the counterintuitive notion that a French diet of cheese, chocolate, and wine could be associated with improved cardiovascular health.

Novartis Found Symp. ;; discussionThe French paradox and wine drinking. Renaud S(1), Gueguen R. Author information: (1)INSERM (Institut National pour la Santé et al Recherche Médicale), UnitUniversité Bordeaux 2, France.

Despite a high level of risk factors such as cholesterol, diabetes, hypertension and a high intake of saturated fat, French males Cited by: The French paradox for CHD may be due to high consumption of wine.

Support for this hypothesis comes Dairy fat (Calories)() Fig 1-Relation between age-standardised death rate from CHD (mean for men and women)' and consumption of dairy fat in countries reporting wine by:   Bacchic Medicine. Wine and Alcohol Therapies from Napoleon to the French Paradox.

Harry W Paul. Amsterdam, New York: Editions Rodopi,pp. US$28, EUR 30 (PB) ISBN: 90 4; US$75, EUR 80 (HB) ISBN: 90 : AG Shaper. SPOTLIGHT: The death rate from heart disease in France is half that of America even though their national diet is high in cream, butter, and cheese.

This has been called the French Paradox. BIG PICTURE: Nutritional orthodoxy insists that animal/saturated fat leads to heart disease.

Some say this doesn’t happen in France because red wine acts as a counterbalance. Laura Fraser February 4, PM (UTC) For much of the past decade, American and British scientists have been annoyed by the phenomenon .The French Paradox is located in the heart of Ballsbridge, Dublin. We like to think that we are a small oasis of France for lovers of everything Francophile.

Our staff will help you choose the right wine for any occasion. The setting is relaxed, simple and chic. The perfect environment to enjoy wine.